Tag Archives: second career

Second Career Ontario Program

17 Jan

It’s a program for people who have been laid off work. Second Career is designed to provide laid-off workers with skills training to help them find jobs in high-demand occupations in Ontario. Its purpose is to provide training that helps laid-off workers move to better jobs than they could obtain without training, such as those with higher skills. The first step in the Second Career program is to visit Employment Ontario’s website. On this website the following information can be found:

What is Second Career?

Second Career provides laid-off workers with

  • skills training to help them find jobs in high-demand occupations in Ontario
  • financial support

Second Career is a cost-sharing grant provided on the basis of need, so you may be asked to contribute what you can to your training or education.

Second Career provides up to $28,000 for

  • tuition
  • books
  • other instruction costs such as manuals or workbooks
  • transportation
  • a basic living allowance

Additional support may be available to accommodate the needs of people with disabilities, dependent care, costs of living away from home and academic upgrading.

Find out more about recent changes to Second Career.

Ontario’s Second Career program is permanent and will continue to help laid-off workers train for new careers in high-demand fields.

As of June 8, Employment Ontario made changes to application guidelines that mean more laid-off Ontarians will be eligible for Second Career. Modifications have been made to the application guidelines for criteria including length of job search and unemployment, work history and skills. Talk to staff at an Employment Ontario assessment centre to see if Second Career is a good fit for you.

Launched in June 2008, Second Career exceeded its three-year goal of helping 20,000 laid-off workers after only 16 months.The program will continue to provide financial support for tuition, books, travel and other expenses to help workers participate in short- and long-term training programs.

How have guidelines for Second Career been changed?

  • As of June 8, Employment Ontario made changes to application guidelines that mean more laid-off Ontarians will be eligible for Second Career. Modifications have been made to the application guidelines for criteria including length of job search and unemployment, work history and skills. Talk to staff at an Employment Ontario assessment centre to see if Second Career is a good fit for you.

    You will need to provide the ministry with proof such as job ads in your local newspaper or a letter from an employer that intends to hire. Your Employment Ontario assessment centre can advise you on how to best gather this information.

    A survey conducted of Second Career students shows that 93 per cent of students have graduated, and over 61 per cent have found jobs within an average of three months.

    What will happen if you don’t qualify for Second Career?

Ontario continues to invest more than $1.2 billion annually in Employment Ontario programs designed to help Ontarians looking for work. Employment Ontario helps more than one million Ontarians every year through services such as:

  • Job placement services, such as résume writing and interview preparation
  • Literacy and basic skills upgrading
  • Ontario Job Creation PartnershipsSecond Career was always intended to be one option among many Employment Ontario program options, to help individuals recently laid-off and requiring training to begin different careers in the new economy.

    The length of the application process can be different for everyone and depends on how long it takes an applicant to complete and submit their Second Career application.

There are many high-demand careers to choose from, including:

  • Industrial electricians
  • Plumbers
  • Carpenters
  • Tilesetters
  • Refrigeration and air conditioning mechanics
  • Truck drivers
  • Insurance adjusters
  • Customer service, information and related clerks
  • Architectural technologists and technicians
  • Telecommunications line and cable workers
  • User support technicians
  • Systems testing technicians
  • Medical radiation technicians
  • Medical sonographers
  • Paralegal and related occupations
  • Community and social service workers
  • Early childhood educators and assistants
  • Chefs
  • Hairstylists and barbers
  • Food and beverage serversYou can only apply for one training program at a time. Support for additional training is sometimes available; for example, to support the academic upgrading or a prerequisite you may need before entering a skills training program.

You are asked to include detailed financial information with your application for Second Career. Staff with the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities will evaluate individual need and determine the amount of financial support the ministry will provide you through Second Career.

The new Second Career guidelines do not change this process and you may be asked to contribute more for your training.

The maximum support Second Career provides for tuition, books and other instructional costs, transportation, and basic living allowance is $28,000. Additional support may be available for: disability accommodation, dependent care, living away from home, and academic upgrading

In all cases, the ministry will work with you to determine a reasonable contribution to the total cost of training. The new guidelines do not change this process and you may be asked to contribute more towards your training.

you may take a temporary job while applying for Second Career, but be sure to talk to your Employment Ontario assessment centre about your plans and financial needs.A temporary job is one that pays less than $423 per week and requires a skill level of NOC D, as classified in the Statistics Canada NOC skills matrix.

Any earnings will be taken into account in determining your eligibility for Second Career and financial support for your training.

Advertisements